Effective aid coordination in lao pdr: policy implications for power sector development

For Lao PDR, Official Development Assistance (ODA) is very important mechanism to promote the potential of investment fund, technology, marketing, management experiences, take part of job creation, increase of income level, upgrade of country development level. Therefore, promotion and attraction of ODA and FDI is become one of priority policy of party and government of Lao PDR. Promotion of the ODA into Lao for development of important sectors; potential sectors are essential necessary for current situation, especially for development of energy sectors because this sector is an major partof country socio-economic development; it is a necessary of living condition of the people, generate income from export of surplus power from domestic use to neighboring country, creation for income from job opportunity for workers. Together with those, it is also a factor contribute to promote other sector development as well.

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work plans. RTIM held in Nov 2007 SWG Review Report shared and recommendations discussed May2007. Man date and minimum performance expectations for each SWG decided and roles in implementing CAP confirmed by October 2007. INGO and wider Membership to SWG sis promoted. 4SWG work plans incorporating simple Joint Monitoring Indicators (that AllSWGs prepare Annual work plans and budgets (where agreed in TORs). All SWGs oversee effective sector dialog that: 1.Builds consensus around clear priorities; 2.Aligns & harmonizes DP support around these priorities ;and 3.Monitors 106 VD§ Goal Action GoL Lead Agency & DP Focal Point Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 Lao FY v) GoL identifies specific capacity constraints to its leadership of the aid effectiveness agenda at the macro levels and decides with DPs on a program of support to remedy this. Allows measurement of their Own progress) developed by Nov 2007and progress reported at RTIM 2007 VD and CAP translated in to Lao and distributed to GoL agencies through workshops All SWGs meet their own standards. 3.(VD 4) DPs support Leadership of GoL and strengthen GoL's capacity to exercise leadership. i) GoL prepares CDFs in key cross cutting areas and sectors of NSEDP. PACSA WB,UN [UNDP] Line Ministries with support from SWGs, where appropriate. Transport, Education and Public Health in process of developing CDF. 4CDF (Transport, Education, Health and Agriculture) finalized by end 2008. A further 2-3 CDF Finalized by 2010. 1. Alignment: Donors base their overall support on partner countries' national development strategies, institutions and procedures DPs Align with the GoL's Strategies 1. (VD 5) DP policies, Activities and aid flows are aligned with GoL strategies and plans. 1. Through the SWGs, DPs broadly align And harmonize their assistance strategies to sector strategies and the NSEDP; ODA flows are aligned with the prioritized investments contained in sector strategies and PIPs with particular attention to the over-and under-funded sections of the PIP. CPI,UN [UNDP] Line Ministries with support from SWGs. 72% of ODA is Recorded on national budget (ODA Report2005). Unfunded parts of the PIP Reduced from X to Y [note: data to be taken from the Ownership sections]. By 2010 all DPs Have broadly aligned their assistance strategies to the NSEDP and sector strategies. 85% of ODA is recorded on national budget (Global target:85%). 107 VD§ Goal Action GoL Lead Agency & DP Focal Point Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY GoL Strengthens Regulations and Procedures with support from DPs, which DPs Increasingly Use 2.(VD 8,9) DPs do not create structures for implementing ODA-funded projects that are parallel to GoL structures. i) GoL and DPs carry out a joint review of ODA-funded implementation structures in order to a) classify them according to the agreed matrix (refer Definitions), and b) summarise lessons learned in integrating project implementation structures to date; ii)SWGs build on lessons learned above to guide progress towards integrating project implementation functions within their sector and monitor progress towards this. DIC, MoFA UN [UNDP] Line Ministries with support from SWGs. 66% of projects use PMUs/PIUs in 2005 (OECD-DAC survey). MCTPC has no PMUs/PIUs. Education has made progress in reducing parallel project structures. Review of current implementation structures and lessons learned by end 2007. All SWGs agree on guidance for integrating project implementation functions within their sector by mid 2008. No new parallel implementation structures created after 2010, unless endorsed by relevant GoL agencies. GoL strengthens development capacity with support from DPs 3.(VD 10,11) DPs align their technical cooperation behind GoL CDFs. i) DPs provide technical cooperation and other capacity building interventions in alignment with GoL developed sector CDFs. CPI, PACSA, WB <10% of total capacity building interventions aligned with CDFs (only MCTPC). For those sectors with CDF, 50% of new capacity building interventions align with CDFs by mid 2009. 50%oftotal capacity development interventions aligned with CDFs. 108 Strengthening Financial Management VD§ Goal Action GoL Lead Agency & DP Focal Point Baseline 2005/06 Lao FY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY 4.(VD 6,8,12, 14) GoL implements reforms to strengthen PFM to enable DPs to increasingly use GoL financial management procedures and systems for their ODA. Strengthening national PFM systems: i) GoL and DPs jointly review and decide on acceptable criteria for PFM regulations and procedures; ii) GoL strengthens budget execution by implementing the budgeting law/centralization of treasury; aligning budget execution with plan; and integrating ODA financing and other revenues into the budget; iii) GoL produces quarterly financial reports on consolidated GoL expenditure, and makes these compatible with GoL financial statistics standards over time; iv) GoL strengthens internal control framework by establishing internal audit functions and associated enforcement mechanisms; v) GoL strengthens the State Audit Organization so that it can provide independent audit opinions to INTOSAI standards in a timely manner; vi) GoL introduces a comprehensive intergovernmental fiscal transfer framework in order to better align policy priorities with the budget. MoF, WB, ADB No functional classification of the budget currently exists. More than 2,000 bank accounts operating outside the control of the MoF. Budget planning is not based on a normative system. Current reporting is on an annual basis, with the report published more than 5 months after end of fiscal year. Budget classification aligns with IMF-GFS and functional classification of budget implemented. TSA established and centralized treasury structure implemented. Budget norms developed for health and education sectors GoL Financial Information System fully established. New Audit Law is implemented. Revised Chart of Accounts and functional classification system implemented in FY 2008/09 Budget. Consolidation of GoL accounts within a unified TSA structure is able to show consolidated GoL position in real time. Budgeting for health and education sector done based on a system of budget norms. Quality budget execution reports produced for 2008/2009. Budget Audit s carried out to INTOSAI standards by 2010. 109 VD§ Goal Action GoL Lead Agency & DP Focal Point Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY DPs supporting national PFM systems: vii) DPs clarify and share with GoL and other DPs their respective legal and policy regulations for the use of national PFM systems and standards to deliver ODA; viii) DPs increasingly align PFM support to GoL priorities; ix) DPs increasingly adopt GoL procedures, rules and regulations; x) DPs increase ODA delivered through aid modalities, such as direct budget support, that best support PBAs and reduce transaction costs; xi) DPs increase the percentage of untied aid executed by GoL as encouraged by the 2001 DAC Recommendation Untying Official Development Assistance to Least Developed Countries. MoF,WB, ADB 34% of ODA to the public sector uses GoL PFM systems [OECD-DAC] -45% ODA used Budget Execution Procedures-30 % ODA used Financial Reporting procedures -28% ODA used State Audit procedures: 5% of total ODA disbursed through PBAs (including direct budget) [OECD-DAC]. 75-80% of ODA is untied (ODA Report 2005). 54% of ODA to the public sector uses GoL PFM systems (Global: 33% increase from baseline). 33% of total ODA disbursed through PBAs (including direct budget) [OECD-DAC]. 90% of ODA is untied (desk review DAC Survey). 5.(VD 13,31) Aid is more Transparent and predictable. i) DPs and GoL develop a common format for reporting total, sectoral and project level aid flows over a multi-year period, compatible with revised ODA database; ii) DPs strive to make indicative and transparent commitments of ODA over annual or multi-year period, in line with Lao Financial Year where possible; MoFA,UN [UNDP] Gap between DPs’ disbursed ODA and GoL recorded as disbursed is 30% (OECD-DAC survey). Common format decided by end 2008. Gap between DPs’ disbursed ODA and amount recorded by GoL as disbursed is 15%. All DPs use common format for either annual or multi-year period. 110 VD§ Goal Action GoL Lead Agency & DPFocalPoint Baseline 2005/06 Lao FY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 Lao FY iii) DPs aid is predictable and released on time, where mutually agreed conditions have been met; iv) DPs work with GoL to strengthen absorptive capacity of GoL to effectively follow upon/use ODA pledges; v) GoL to present annual budget reports to the National Assembly & citizens, which include ODA. Strengthening National Procurement Regulations and Procedures 6.(VD 6,8,15, 16) GoL and DPs commit sufficient resources to strengthening procurement regulations and procedures and enhance their efficiency, transparency and utilization. i) DPs clarify and share with GoL and other DPs their respective legal and policy regulations for the use of national procurement systems and standards to deliver ODA; ii) GoL and DPs jointly review and decide on acceptable criteria on procurement regulations and procedures; iii) GoL Procurement Manual and Standard Bidding Documents are distributed to DPs; iv) GoL fully implements new procurement decree; v) GoL recruits and trains sufficient number of staff at the PrMO; vi) Systematic collection of procurement MoF,WB [X%] of public procurements through competitive procedures (note: data from PrMO end 2007). [X%] of public procurements through Standard Bidding Documents (Note: data from PrMO end 2007). 17% of DPs use GoLs procurement procedures (OECD- DAC). Recommendations from joint review shared with GoL and DPs by 2008. Procurement website developed by end 2007 (PrMO currently in process of developing). Procurement Manual and Standard Bidding Documents updated and made publicly accessible by 2008. [X%] of public procurements through competitive procedures (PrMO). [X%] of public procurements through Standard Bidding Documents (PrMO). 40% of DPs use GoLs procurement procedures (OECD-DAC). 111 VD§ Goal Action GoLLead Agency & DPFocalPoint Baseline 2005/06 Lao FY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY information and monitoring of performance and outcomes (through PrMO); vii) DPs increasingly adopt GoL procedures, rules and regulations to manage ODA- related procurement. Strengthening Environmental and Social Standards for ODA-Funded Projects 7.(VD 17) With DP support, GoL develops technical & policy capacity for social, gender & environmental impact analysis & enforcement legislation. i) DPs clarify and share with GoL and other DPs their respective legal and policy regulations for the use of national environmental and social standards in ODA projects and programs; ii) Review current guide lines, standards and legislation for conducting social (including gender, HIV/AIDS and Employment, etc) and environmental impact analysis for ODA projects, and identify/implement areas that need improvement; iii) Discussion and approval of new guidelines/monitoring indicators for environmental and social impact analysis; iv) Strengthen the capacity of relevant GoL agencies to enforce the above regulations. STEA, UN [FAO], Sweden / SIDA Assessment completed by mid 2008. Revised guidelines / standards drafted and approved by end 2008. Development of joint monitoring indicators. Guidelines implemented. Social impact assessments include gender assessment. Use of Joint Monitoring indicators Adoption of harmonised environmental and social standards at all levels of government. All applicable ODA projects adhere to social and environmental legislation that is 112 VD§ Goal Action GoLLead Agency & DPFocalPoint Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY monitored and enforced by GoL 3. Harmonisation and Simplification: DPs’Actions are more Harmonized, Transparent and Collectively Effective 1.(VD 18) GoL & DPs conduct & use core diagnostic reviews, carryout joint reviews & share results. i) Through the SWGs where appropriate, GoL and DPs share list of planned country analytical work; identify priority research gaps and areas for joint country analytical work; ii) GoL and DPs conduct joint analytical work wherever possible; iii) Mechanisms identified and implemented to share research/review results to DPs, line ministries and provincial GoL (eg. RTM website or global CAW site). EC UN [UNDP] Line Ministries with support from SWGs, where appropriate. 30% of CAW is joint (OECD/DAC) [Global: 30% of country analytic work is joint (2004)] Consolidated list developed, disaggregated by sector/programme on annual or multi-annual basis. Joint research programme decided for 2 sectors by 2008 (Health, Education). 66% of CAWis joint. [global: 66%] 2.(VD 19,22) DPs harmonise training and reduce administrative burden of GoL related to the number of duplicative missions. i) DPs pursue decentralization & delegation of authority to country offices; ii) GoL and DPs decide on, and document coreprinciples/goodpractices regarding missions and training scheduling, including consideration of mission freeperiod(s)(eg.April to June -annual plan formulation); DIC, MoFA, EC Line Ministries with support from SWGs, where appropriate. 550 Missions in 2005/06 (OECD/DAC). 12% of missions are joint (OECD/DAC). Best practices identified by December2007. Harmonised and/or joint mission and training schedules introduced for pilot sectors (Transport, Education&Health) by 2008. 50% of missions are joint. 113 VD§ Goal Action GoLLead Agency & DPFocalPoint Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY iii) GoL and DPs (through the SWGs, where appropriate) share their training and mission plans and organize harmonized and/or joint training and missions where applicable; iv) DPs increasingly share findings from missions among DPs and GoL (eg.RTM 3.(VD 20,25) GoL & DPs rationalize regulations, procedures & incentives by implementing common arrangements. i) GoL and DPs decide on which DP regulations and procedures should use common arrangements and timetable for implementation; - DSA, salaries; ii) DPs carry out an overall review of above identified current practices and recommend policy/ practice to harmonize DP procedures & incentives; iii) Common procedures implemented (beginning in PBA sectors: Transport, Education, and Health). PACSA,MoF, EC Line Ministries with support from SWGs, where appropriate. ADB (Transport)& Identification of procedures and time table by end 2007. DSA and salaries of GoL staff on ODA projects harmonized by 2008. GoL Guidelines gradually introduced and, where possible, applied to on-going projects/ programmes. 4.(VD 21) GoL and DPs increase aid effectiveness through coordinated approaches e.g. PBAs. i) GoL reviews and improves (where necessary) national financial systems to channel budget support and pooled funding identified for PBA to relevant sector; ii) DPs expand use of coordinated approaches to programming and resource mobilisation through SWG framework. MoF, Line Ministries with support from SWGs. 5%ofODA disbursed to PBAs (including direct budget support). (OECD-DAC) DPs coordinate programs in Health, Education and Transport sectors. 33% of ODA disbursed to PBAs (including direct budget support). 114 VD§ Goal Action GoLLead Agency & Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY 4. Managing For Results: Managing Resources and Improving Decision-Making For Results 1.(26, 28) Results orientated frameworks, that both GoL and DPs use, enable monitoring of development results and of progress toward aid effectiveness. i) Further strengthen the national statistical system by implementing the National Statistics Strategy 2006-10; ii) Develop a set of indicators to monitor progress at national and sectoral levels, and decide on surveys/studies to collect data for these indicators and their periodicity; iii) Develop, train on and implement results orientated frameworks to monitor and evaluate the 1) implementation and 2) impact of the NSEDP and sector programmes, using strengthened national statistical systems and other tools such as the Lao Info database and MDG Report; iv) DPs work with GoL to prepare joint formats for periodic reporting and align to above results oriented frame works; v) Review progress of SWGs against their own Joint Monitoring Indicators vi) Develop and implement mechanism to monitor progress against aid- effectiveness commitments set out in CAP; CPI, UN [UNDP], Sweden/ SIDA National Statistical Strategy for 2006- 10 has been completed. Develop & implement Master Plan. Statistical needs assessment by end 2007. National and sectoral indicators decided. Lao Info is used by GoL as a monitoring tool for implementation of NSEDP. 2007 MDG Progress Report published. Results Frameworks for general NSEDP prepared ands hared by end 2007: Sector Specific Results Frameworks for Transport by end 2007, and for Education and Health by end 2008. General simple joint format for monitoring and reporting endorsed by DPs by mid 2008. Results Frameworks well advanced by 2010. All DPs use common formats for monitoring and reporting. ODA Database fully operational, data reliable and transparently available to GoL and DPs by 2010. 115 VD§ Goal Action GoLLead Agency & DPFocalPoint vii) Continue to participate in the OECD- DAC Survey; viii) Revise the ODA Database to provide transparent and accurate reports on ODA-financed projects and programmes showing financial inputs (commitments & disbursements) and output progress. Information is shared across MoFA, MoF,CPI and line ministries and with DPs. Baseline 2005/06LaoFY Performance Milestones Target 2010/11 LaoFY OECD-DAC Country Worksheet April2009. Proposal for revised ODA database shared and endorsed by GoL and DPs by 2008. 5. Mutual Accountability: Both GoL and DPs are Accountable for Development Results 1.(VD 29) Progress over decided commitments on aid effectiveness is assessed. i) GoL and DPs report on and assess progress in CAP implementation at CAP Review Meetings, and outcomes of which are presented at RTIM; ii) GoL and DPs undertake independent evaluations/assessments of particular aid-effectiveness issues. DIC, MoFA, UN [UNDP] First CAP Review Meeting held in October/November 2007 CAP implementation reported at RTIM2007. Identify topics and timetable for evaluations and funding arrangements by end 2007. Regular mutual assessments shared. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2007 116 APENDIX 3 "QUESTIONS FOR DEEP PERSONAL INTERVIEW": Self Introduction: My Name is Khammany Inthirath; I am now doing my PhD Dissertation on “Effective Aid Coordination in Lao PDR: Policy Implications for Power Sector Development”. I would like to have your assistance in answering my questions. Section I: Overview about ODA Coordination System 1. What do you know about external assistance coordination for Lao PDR, about ODA using in Lao PDR? 2. What do you think about/ assess the current situation of external assistance coordination and ODA using in Lao PDR in general and in power sector in particular? Do you know any model of effective use of it? 3. Do you know any country in the world where ODA is used effectively most? What lessons Lao PDR can learn from them? 4. How do you think about power sector development situation? What do you expect from the sector development in the next ten to fifteen years ahead? 5. What do you suggest for the government of Lao PDR to make the external assistance/ ODA effectively used and to further the power sector? 6. Do you have any other recommendation regarding the mentioned subject? 7. What is the aid effectiveness agenda in Lao PDR? Who are the involving institutions? 8. What is the local effort from international agencies and donor communities for aid effectiveness in Laos? 9. Does the local development community support the local government in aid coordination? Section 2: Purpose of Development Partner Coordination Units 10. What kinds of activities does the donor coordination unit carry out? Section 3: Roles and Responsibilities of Development Partner Coordination Units 11. Who manages the Development Partner Coordination Units? 117 12. What is the role of the Development Partner Coordination Units? 13. Who makes decisions in the Development Partner Coordination Units? Section 4: Organization of Development Partner Coordination Units 14. Is the donor coordination unit a standalone unit or is part of a larger unit? 15. What is the name of the department under which the Development Partner Coordination Units exists? 16. How many coordination units do you have? 17. How many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are working in the energy sector? 18. How many international NGOs (INGOs) are working in the your sector? 19. How many people work in the Development Partner Coordination Units? 20. Who makes up the Development Partner Coordination Units? 21. How many development partners are active in your institution? Section 5: Financing 22. How is the Development Partner Coordination Units supported? 23. How are the Development Partners’ Funds channeled through your institution? 24. What type of budget support are the Development Partners providing? 25. What are the contractual arrangements that govern the relationship with the Development Partners in your institute? 26. How do you make decisions in terms of funds allocation and reallocation? 27. Do you monitor the expenditures by different donors/NGOs? 28. For what kind of donor/NGO projects/activities do you monitor the expenditures? 29. Please specify how you link donor/NGO expenditure monitoring with your donor coordination? 30. Who pays for the donor coordination unit activities? Section 6: Strengths and Accomplishments 31. What do you consider to be the strengths of Development Partner Coordination Units? 32. How would you rate the efficiency (time/money/outputs) of the donor coordination activities? 118 33. How do you monitor the activities that have to be accomplished by different donors/NGOs? 34. Do you have a comprehensive energy sector plan which comprises most of the donors/NGOs activities? 35. Does the plan have output and/or outcomes indicators? 36. How did you establish the indicators? 37. Are there certain elements of your donor coordination activities that you would like to highlight or describe further? Section 7: Challenges 38. What do you consider to be the weaknesses of the Development Partner Coordination Units? 39. What do you consider to be the major/important internal challenges for the unit? 40. Do you monitor the flow of funds (incoming) from donors/ NGO activities? 41. Are the funds entering regularly (as scheduled)? 42. Do you know when different donors’ and international and national NGOs’ support will expire? 43. Do you map the duration and expiration of donors’ and NGOs’ support? 44. How is the Ministry of Energy and Mines planning to respond to the phasing out/expiration of donors’ and NGOs’ support? 119 APENDIX 4 The List of Interviewees (Full name, capacity, name of organization, Contact number). 1. Prime Mister’s office, National Committee For Business Development 01 People 1. Mr. Phayvanh CHANHDAVONG Deputy Director General Executive Secretary to the Minister, President of NCBD. Mobile Phone: 8520 55527829. Email: chandavong@yahoo.com 2. Ministry of Planning and Investment 5 People 1. Dr. Bounthavy SYSOUPHANHTHONG, Vice-Minister of Ministry of Planning and Investment. Office Tel : 85621 217020 2. Dr. Kikeo, Director General of Ministry of Planning and Investment Office. Office Tel : 85621 217010 3. Mr. Phesai PHIATHEP, Director General of Planning Department. Office Tel : 85621 217009 4. Mr. Achong LAOMAO, Acting Director General of Investment Promotion Department. Office Tel : 85621 223002 5. Ms. Sisoumboun AONAVONG, Acting Director General of Internal Corporation Department. Office Tel : 85621 216755 3. Ministry of Justice 1 People 1. Mr. Vilath PHEWON Director General of Ministry of Justice Office Mobile Phone : 85620 99801552 4. Ministry of Education and Sport 2 People 1. Dr. Saikhong SAINASIN, Vice Dean of National University of Lao Office Tel : 85621 770381 2. Dr. Phosy CHANHMING, Deputy Director Research Office of National University of Lao. Mobile phone: 85620 23300555. E-mail : phosyc@gmail.com 5. Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) 9 People 120 1. Mr Viraphonh VIRAVONG, Vice-Minister of Ministry of Energy and Mines Office Tel: 85621 413000/454614 2. Dr. Sinava SOUPHANOUVONG, Vice-Minister of Ministry of Energy and Mines Office Tel: 85621 413000 3. Dr. Bountheung PHENGVONGSA, Director General of Ministry of Energy and Mines Office. Mobile Phone : 85620 55519338 4. Dr. Daovong PHONKEO, Director General of Power Policy and Planning Department Mobile Phone : 85620 99801592 E-mail daovongph@yahoo.com 5. Dr. Xayphone BOUNSOU, Vice Minister Assistant, Deputy Manager of Planning Division. Mobile phone: 85620 22435770. E-mail: xayphone3000@yahoo.co.jp 6. Mr. Saypaseuth PHOMSOUPHA, Director General of Business Department Mobile phone : 85620 45253940 E-mail: xayphaseuth@deb.gov.la 7. Mr. Sisoukan SAYARATH, Director General of Energy Management Department Mobile phone :85620 99801583 E-mail: sisoukansayarath@yahoo.com 8. Mr. Hatsady SISOURAYH, Director General of Institute of Renewable Energy Promotion. Mobile: 85620 55511537 E-mail: hatsady@demem.org 9. Mr. Stuart GLAUBERMAN, Public Relations Advisor (America) to the Department of Energy Policy and Planning Mobile phone : 85620 28121844 E-mail: stuxb808@gmail.com 6. World Bank (WB) 1 People 1. Mr. Veasna BUN, WB Team Leader for Rural Electrification Phase II Project. Office Tel : 85621 266200. E-mail : vbun@worldbank.org 7. International Finance Corporation (IFC) 2 People 1. Mr. Almilion CHATZINIKOLAOU ADB Representative to Lao PDR, Office Tel: 85621 266300. Website : www.ifc.org/Mekong 2. Ms. Sisomsouk SAIMOUNKHOUN, Office Administrator of IFC Mobile Phone: 85620 55518670. E-mail: tsaimoungkhoun@ifc.org 8. Asian Development Bank (ADB) 2 People 1. Mr. Takafumi Kadono, Energy Special Vietnam Resident Mission Position, Office Tel: +844 39331374. E-mail: tkadono@adb.org 121 2. Mr. Phosay PHOMMACHANH, Project Officer ADB-Lao PDR Mission. Office Tel: 85621 250444 9. Electricity of Laos (EDL) 9 People 1. Mr. Sisavath THIRAVONG, Managing Director & CEO of Electricity of Laos Mobile: 85620 55512749 E-mail: sisavth_th@yahoo.com 2. Mr. Thongphet DOUANGNGEUNE, Deputy Managing Director of Electricity of Laos Mobile: 85620 22223687 E-mail: dthongphet@YAHOO.COM 3. Mr. Bountham SENEPHANSIRI, Deputy Managing Director of Electricity of Laos Mobile: 85620 55570021 E-mail: bounthamsp@yahoo.com 4. Mr. Vongmany SONEKETSOULINH, Deputy Managing Director of Electricity of Laos Mobile: 85620 22223799 E-mail: vongmany-s@hotmail.com 5. Mr. Duangsy PHARAYOK, Deputy Managing Director of Electricity of Laos Mobile: 85620 22333000 E-mail: duangsy@yahoo.com 6. Mr. Komonchanh PHETASA, Manager of Business Department, Mobile Phone : 85620 55555868 E-mail: komon128@hotmail.com 7. Mr. Bounma MANIVONG, Manager of Finance Department Mobile Phone : 85620 555506739 E-mail: bm.mani09@gmail.com 8. Mr. Ken THEPVONGSA, Manager of Transmission Line and Substation Department, Mobile Phone: 85620 22805666. 9. Mr. Khamsing PHOSARATH, Manager of Technical Department, Mobile Phone: 85620 55530849. 10. EDL Generation Public Company (EDL-GEN) 3 People 1. Mr. BounOum SYVANPHENG, Managing Director & CEO Mobile Phone : 8562022223899 E-mail bounoum_syv@yahoo.com / edlgenhq@edlgen.com.la 2. Ms. Rattana PRATHOUMVAN , Deputy Managing Director, COO Mobile Phone : (856-20) 96966555 & 22205084 E-mail: lattana2005@yahoo.com / rettanadmd@edlgen.com.la 3. Mr Dr. Bounsalong SOUTHIDARA, Deputy Managing Director, CFO. Mobile Phone : (856-20) 96964555 / Office: (856-21) 316140 E-mail : bounsalong@gmail.com / bounsalong@edlgen.com.la 11. Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) 2 People 122 1. Mr. Takayuki Niimura, Expert Policy advisor of Department of Energy Policy and Planning. Office Tel : 85621 415038 Email:hashisan2001@yahoo.com.co.jp 2. Mr. Nobuo HASHIMOTO, Expert Policy advisor of Department of Energy Policy and Planning. Office Tel : 85621 415038 Email: takayuki.niimura@gmail.com 12. National IT Promotion Agency (NIPA) from Korea 2 People 1. Dr. Dok-Han Kim, Expert Finance of Electricity of Laos. Tel : 85620 96590680 Email: kdh0567@yahoo.com 2. Mr. Tai Dong Lee, Expert Hydropower of Electricity of Laos. Tel: 85620 95329494 Email: tdlee0502@naver.com 123 APPENDIX 5 Energy Development Plan 5.2. Projection of Investment on Northern Region Power Development Sources from 2010-2020 Location (Province) Capacity (MW) Energy/ year Project Value EDL Loan EDL contribution No. Project Names Province MW GWh p.a. Phant Factor Project Period Completion Year Project Types Mill. US$ Mill. US$ Mill. US$ % 1 Nam Nhon Bokeo 2.4 11.5 55% 2006-10 2010 BOT 4.50 2 Nam Tha 3 Luangnamtha 1.3 8 70% 2010-11 2011 BOT 1.50 3 Nam Ngum 5 Vientiane 120 500 48% 2001-11 2011 BOT 200.00 6 3.0% 4 Nam Long Luangnamtha 5 38 87% 2009-12 2012 BOT 12.90 0.78 6.0% 5 Nam Sim Huaphanh 8 30 43% 2011-13 2013 BOT 19.40 6 Nam Ham 2 Sayaboury 5 15 34% 2011-13 2013 BOT 8.00 7 Nam Khan 2 Luangprabang 126.9 568 51% 2010-14 2014 BT 314.60 298.87 15.73 5.0% 8 Nam Boun 2 Phongsaly 15 96 73% 2011-14 2014 BT 30.00 27 3 10.0% 9 Nam Ngiew Xieng Khuang 20 63 36% 2010-14 2014 BOT 38.00 10 Nam Beng Oudomxai 34 200 67% 2010-14 2014 BOT 65.00 11 Nam Tha 1 Luangnamtha 168 721 49% 2009-14 2014 BOT 350.00 12 Viengphoukha (Lignite) Luangnamtha 200 1401.6 80% 2011-14 2014 BOT 420.00 13 Nam Pot Xieng Khuang 20 87.6 50% 2010-14 2014 BOT 44.00 14 Nam Chein Xieng Khuang 80 390 56% 2010-15 2015 BT 165.00 148.5 16.5 10.0% 15 Nam Phak Oudomxai 30 165 63% 2009-15 2015 BT 43.60 43.56 16 Hongsa (Lignite) Sayaboury 100 700.8 80% 2008-15 2015 BOT 3,728.00 17 Nam Ngiep 2 Xieng Khuang 180 1170 74% 2010-15 2015 BOT 345.40 18 Nam Phak Luangnamtha 130 750 66% 2010-15 2015 BOT 208.00 19 Nam Ngum 4 Xieng Khuang 220 1100 57% 2010-15 2015 BOT 696.00 20 Nam Ou 2 Luangprabang 120 545.8 52% 2008-16 2016 BOT 226.00 21 Nam Ou 6 Phongsaly 90 417.9 53% 2008-16 2016 BOT 290.00 22 Nam Khan 3 Luangprabang 47 222 54% 2011-16 2016 BT 117.00 111.15 6 5.1% 23 Nam Xam 1 (Off take) Huaphanh 60 214 41% 2009-16 2016 BOT 117.00 24 Mekong (Sayaboury, (Off take) Sayaboury 60 420 80% 2008-19 2017 BOT 2,497.50 25 Mekong Luangprabang, (Off take) Luangprabang 150 660 50% 2008-17 2017 BOT 2,794.00 26 Mekong Pakbeng Luangprabang 150 754 57% 2010-20 2019 BOT 2,994.00 27 Nam Ou 5 Phongsaly 240 1156.3 55% 2011-16 2016 BOT 291.00 28 Nam Ou 1 Luangprabang 160 798.9 57% 2010-18 2018 BOT 256.00 29 Nam Ou 3 Luangprabang 150 709.6 54% 2010-18 2018 BOT 244.00 30 Nam Ou 4 Phongsaly 116 569 56% 2010-18 2018 BOT 251.00 31 Nam Ou 7 Phongsaly 190 915.4 55% 2010-18 2018 BOT 373.00 Total (2010-2015) 1466 8016 62% 100% 17,144.40 629.1 48 EDL 252 1219 55% 17.20% 670.20 629.1 48 124 IPP(d) 1114 6096 62% 76.00% 2,638.70 IPP(e) 100 701 80% 6.80% 12,420.50 Total (2016-2020) 1533 7383 55% 100% 18,858.80 692 52.8 EDL 47 222 54% 3.10% 737.20 692 52.8 IPP(d) 976 4695 55% 63.70% 2,902.60 IPP(e) 510 2466 55% 33.30% 13,662.60 Total (2010-2020) 2999 15398 59% 100% 36,003.20 1321.1 100.8 EDL 299 1441 55% 10.00% 1,407.30 1321.1 100.8 IPP(d) 2090 10791 59% 69.70% 5,541.30 IPP(e) 610 3167 59% 20.30% 26,083.10 125 5.3. Projection of Investment on Central Region Power Development Sources 2010-2020 Location (Province) Capacity (MW) Energy/ year Project Value EDL Loan EDL contribution No. Project Names Province MW GWh p.a. Phant Factor Project Period Completion Year Project Types Mill. US$ Mill. US$ Mill. US$ % Owner 1 Nam Lik 1/2 Vientiane 100 435 50% 2008-10 2010 BOT 150 IPP(d) 2 Nam Ngum 2 Vientiane 615 2218 41% 2006-10 2010 BOT 790 60 IPP(e) 3 Nam Song (Extension) Vientiane 6 28 53% 2008-11 2011 BT 13.3 11 2.3 17% EDL 4 Nam Phao Bolikhamxai 1.5 3.3 25% 2008-11 2011 BOT 3.5 IPP(d) 5 Theunhinboun (Extension) Bolikhamxai 220 946 49% 2008-12 2012 BOT 498 86.4 17% IPP(e) 6 Nam Gnuang 8 Bolikhamxai 60 316 60% 2009-12 2012 BOT 120 IPP(d) 7 Nam Sana Vientiane 10 43.8 50% 2010-13 2013 BT 31.37 31.37 EDL 8 Nam Ngum 1 (Extension) Vientiane 40 88 25% 2010-14 2014 BT 70 63 7 10% EDL 9 Nam Mang 1 Bolikhamxai 50 235 54% 2010-14 2014 BOT 196.6 IPP(d) 10 Nam Lik 1 Vientiane 60 248.7 47% 2010-14 2014 BOT 130 IPP(d) 11 Nam Kan Vientiane 5 19.7 45% 2010-14 2014 BOT 5.5 IPP(d) 12 Kengseuaten Bolikhamxai 45 200 51% 2009-15 2015 BT 90 EDL 13 Nam Bak Vientiane 160 740 53% 2010-15 2015 BOT 260 15.6 IPP(d) 14 Nam Phai Vientiane 60 280 53% 2010-15 2015 BOT 110.5 IPP(d) 15 Nam Theun 1 (Off take) Bolikhamxai 50 250 57% 2008-17 2017 BOT 695 IPP(e) 16 Nam Mouan Bolikhamxai 105 472.1 51% 2010-17 2017 BOT 271.4 IPP(d) 17 Nam San 3 (Down) Xieng Khuang 30 120 46% 2010-18 2018 BOT 76 IPP(d) 18 Nam Ngum (Down) Vientiane Capital 60 300 57% 2010-18 2018 BOT 122 IPP(d) 19 Nam Ngeip 1 (Off take) Bolikhamxai 18 102 65% 2010-18 2018 BOT 344 IPP(e) 20 Nam Phouan Vientiane 60 280 53% 2010-19 2019 BOT 115 IPP(d Total (2010-2015) 1433 5801 46% 100% 4092.2 181 95.7 EDL 101 360 41% 7.1% 204.7 181 95.7 IPP(d) 497 2278 52% 34.7% 1560.5 IPP(e) 835 3164 43% 58.3% 2327 Total (2016-2020) 323 1524 54% 100% 4501.4 199.1 105.3 EDL 225.1 199.1 105.3 IPP(d) 255 1172 52% 78.9% 1716.6 IPP(e) 68 352 59% 21.1% 2559.7 Total (2010-2020) 1756 7326 48% 100% 8593.6 380 201 EDL 101 360 41% 5.8% 429.8 380 201 IPP(d) 752 3450 52% 42.8% 3277.1 IPP(e) 903 3516 44% 51.4% 4886.7 126 APPENDIX 6 Projection of Investment on Power Development Sources from 2010-2020 (Whole Country) Capacity (MW) Energy/ year Project Value EDL Loan EDL contribution Project Names MW GWh p.a. Mill. US$ Mill. US$ Mill. US$ Total (2010-2015) 3,945 20,321 25,939.70 1,204.2 175.7 EDL 548 2,693 1,450.90 1,204.2 175.7 IPP(d) 2,373 13,427 6,955.30 IPP(e) 1,024 4,201 16,118.50 Total (2016-2020) 2,761 13,636 28,533.70 1,324.6 193.2 EDL 103 372 1,596.00 1,324.6 193.2 IPP(d) 2,010 10,168 7,650.80 IPP(e) 648 3,096 17,730.40 Total (2010-2020) 6,706 33,957 54,473.40 2,528.8 368.9 EDL 650 3,065 3,047.00 2,528.8 368.9 IPP(d) 4,383 23,595 14,606.10 IPP(e) 1,672 7,297 33,848.90 d = domestic e = export IPP = Independent Power Producer EDL = Electricity Due Laos. The table above shows the projection of power development plan between 2010 and 2020. During the period, the target of development plan is to install production facility with the capacity of 6,706 MW, with energy production of 33,957 GWh per annum. The total investment cost will be 54,573.4 million US$. Among these, EDL will invest 3 billion US$, while IPP for domestic will invest 14.6 billion US$ and IPP for export will invest 33.8 billion US$. The EDL plans to borrow 2,528.8 million US$, perhaps through ODA as low interest loan if possible, or commercial loan. EDL will invest its own fund of 368.9 million US$ during the period of 2010 and 2020. 127 APPENDIX 7 Detail estimate of energy sector projection 1. Existing Production Facility Name of Project Location Installed Capacity Status Investors (Sponsors) No. Province (MW) Progress of project Commercial Operation Date Owner- ships Equity share Planned Market Remarks 1 Nam Dong (H) Luangprabang 1 In Operation 1970 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos 2 Selabam (H) Champasak 5 In Operation 1970 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos 3 Nam Ngum 1 (H) Vientiane 155 In Operation 1971 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos/ Thailand 4 Xeset 1 (H) Saravane 45 In Operation 1990 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos/ Thailand 5 Nam Ko (H) Oudomxay 1.5 In Operation 1996 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos • EdL (Laos) 60% • Nordic 20% 6 Theun-Hinboun (H) Bolikhamxay 210 In Operation 1998 IPP(e) • GMS 20% Laos/ Thailand IPP(e) • EdL (Laos) 20% • Suez Energy (Belgium) 60% 7 Houay Ho (H) Champasak/ Attapeu 152.1 In Operation 1999 • HHTC (Thailand) 20% Laos/ Thailand 150MW (Export) and 2.1MW (Domestic) 8 Nam Leuk (H) Vientiane 60 In Operation 2000 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos/ Thailand 9 Nam Ngay (H) Phongsaly 1.2 In Operation 2003 EdL • EdL(Laos) 100% Laos 10 Nam Mang3 (H) Vientiane 40 In Operation 2004 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos/ Thailand 11 Xeset 2 (H) Saravane 76 In Operation 2009 EdL • EdL (Laos) 100% Laos 12 Nam Theun 2 Khammuane 1088 In Operation 2009 IPP(e) LHSE (Laos) 25%, EDF (France) 35%, EGCO (Thailand) 25%, ITD (Thailand) 15% Laos/ Thailand Off take 75 MW (Domestic) 13 Nam Lik 1/2 100 2010 IPP(e) Micro-hydro 1.405 In Operation Prov. • Prov. (Laos) 100% Laos Solar 0.214 In Operation Prov. • Prov. (Laos) 100% Laos Diesel 0.74 In Operation Prov. • Prov. (Laos) 100% Laos Total 1937.2 EdL 384.7 IPP(e) 1550.1 Prov. 2.36 (H): Hydropower plant FS: Feasibility Study EdL: Electricité du Laos (EdL) HOA: Head of Agreement IPP: Independent Power Producer MOU: Memorandum of Understanding IPP(e): Exporting IPP PDA: Project Development Agreement IPP(d): Domestic IPP PPA: Power Purchase Agreement TBD: To Be Determined SIOD: Start Initial Operation Date 128 2. Demand Forecast Northern Area Descriptions Units 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Phongsaly 1 2 3 Sub-Total Copper Mining 1 at Yot Ou District Copper Mining 2 at Yot Ou District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2.3 11.8 2.3 11.8 13 Bokeo 1 Sub-Total Dokngiewkham (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - 0.2 1.2 0.2 1.2 0.2 1.2 0.2 1.2 2 12 12 Luangnamtha 1 2 3 4 5 Sub-Total Copper Mining at Houay Mo, Long District Economic Spacial Zone (Boten) Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants Railway station Train running (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 0.2 0.9 0.2 0.9 10.9 61.8 10.0 56.9 0.9 4.9 15.8 87.6 10.1 57.4 5.0 26.3 0.8 3.9 65.9 350.6 10.2 57.8 8.0 42.0 47.7 250.7 53 35 Oudomxai 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Sub-Total Cement Factory at Thong Na Village, Namo District Copper Mining at Kiew Chep Village-, Namo District Iron melting factory, at Phu Phan Village, La District Lead- Zinc Factory at Nam Pheng Village, Namo District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants Total Load during Construction of Railway Railway station (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 52.0 273.3 - - 52.0 273.3 62.0 330.2 10.0 56.9 - - 52.0 273.3 62.1 330.7 10.1 57.4 - - 52.0 273.3 67.3 357.9 10.2 57.8 5.1 26.8 52.0 273.3 30 11 Xiengkhuang 1 2 3 Sub-Total Iron melting factory, at Nator Village, Khoun District Iron melting factory, at Yot Pieng Village, Pek District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 18.0 94.6 18.0 94.6 18.0 94.6 18.0 94.6 - - - - 6.0 31.5 6.0 31.5 52 41 Huaphanh 1 Sub-Total Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - - - - - 1.2 6.3 1.2 6.3 1.2 6.3 1.2 6.3 Luangprabang 1 2 3 4 5 Sub-Total Cement factory at Many Village, Nambak District Gold Mining at Phapon Village, Pak Ou District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants Total Load during Construction of Railway Railway station (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 46.6 247.6 7.0 39.4 - - 39.6 208.1 47.7 253.6 7.1 39.7 1.0 5.7 - - 39.6 208.1 47.7 253.9 7.1 40.1 1.0 5.7 - - 39.6 208.1 90.7 479.7 7.2 40.4 1.0 5.7 42.9 225.4 39.6 208.1 38 32 Sayaboury 1 2 Sub-Total Copper Mining at Pang Kham Village, Paklay District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - - - - - 0.5 2.8 0.5 2.8 0.5 2.8 0.5 2.8 10 Total (Northern) (MW) (GWh) - - 116.8 616.4 138.6 740.2 127.5 682.4 234.0 1,241.8 390.4 2,127.0 129 Central Area Descriptions Units 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2 Vientiane Province 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Sub-Total Phubia Gold/copper Mining Phubia Gold/copper Mining( Hoayxai ) Iron melting factory, at Vangvieng District Iron melting factory, at Namchan Village, Saysomboon District Cement Factory at Vangvieng (Extension) Iron melting factory, at Vangvieng District (sinhouang) Gold/Copper Mining at Maipakphoun Village, Sanakham District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants Total Load during Construction of Railway Railway station (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) 32.0 210.2 32.0 210.2 59.3 355.0 33.0 216.8 0.9 4.7 25.4 133.5 146.6 926.0 43.0 282.5 20.0 131.4 27.3 203.1 30.0 170.8 0.9 4.7 25.4 133.5 179.4 1,128.9 43.3 284.8 20.2 132.5 12.0 84.0 27.3 203.1 50.0 284.7 1.2 6.5 25.4 133.5 220.8 1,358.0 43.7 287.0 20.3 133.5 12.1 84.7 25.0 142.3 27.3 203.1 50.0 284.7 17.0 89.2 25.4 133.5 387.9 2,164.5 44.0 289.3 20.5 134.6 12.2 85.3 25.2 143.4 27.3 203.1 200.0 1,000.0 48.8 256.2 - - 10.0 52.6 Vientiane Capital 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Sub-Total Gold Mining at Khok Pheung Village, Sangthong District Iron melting factory, at Ban Hai Village (Tha Ngon), Xaythany District Kea Potash Factory at Thongmang Village, Saythany District Kea Potash Factory at Nathom Village, Saythany District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants Total Load during Construction of Railway Railway station (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 10.9 71.2 8.0 56.0 - - 2.9 15.2 47.0 203.6 5.0 35.0 31.0 96.9 8.1 56.4 - - 2.9 15.2 96.1 357.4 5.0 35.3 80.0 250.0 8.1 56.9 - - 2.9 15.2 96.2 358.2 5.1 35.6 80.0 250.0 8.2 57.4 - - 2.9 15.2 95.4 354.2 5.1 35.8 80.0 250.0 8.3 57.8 - - - - 2.0 10.5 Bolikhamxai 1 Sub-Total Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 0.2 1.3 0.2 1.3 9.2 48.6 9.2 48.6 9.0 47.3 9.0 47.3 7.5 39.4 7.5 39.4 14.3 74.9 14.3 74.9 Total (Central) (MW) (GWh) 32.0 210.2 70.4 427.5 202.8 1,178.1 284.5 1,533.7 324.4 1,755.6 497.6 2,593.6 Southern Area Descriptions Units 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Khammouane 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Sub-Total Potassium at Yang Koung Village (Ngom Ma Lat) Thakhek District Jiaxi Mining at Thakhek District Metal Melting Factory at Nong Cheun-Borneng Village, Hinboon District Cement Factory at Nakham Village, Thakhek District (Existing) Cement Factory at Nakham Village, Thakhek District (Extension) Economic Spacial Zone Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) 17.0 52.0 17.0 52.0 17.0 52.0 17.0 52.0 - - 17.0 52.0 17.0 52.0 - - 17.0 52.0 17.0 52.0 - - 37.0 127.0 20.0 75.0 17.0 52.0 - - 70 304 20.0 75.0 22.0 124.0 17.0 52.0 5.0 21.9 6.0 31.5 Savannakhet 1 2 3 Sub-Total Xepon Gold/Copper Mining at Vilabury District Economic Spacial Zone (Nongdeun) Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) 43.0 317.6 43.0 317.6 44.0 323.8 43.5 321.2 0.5 2.5 54.0 380.7 43.5 321.2 10.0 56.9 0.5 2.5 73.5 492.1 43.5 321.2 30.0 170.8 - - 93.5 605.9 43.5 321.2 50.0 284.7 - - 93 605 43.5 321.2 50.0 284.7 Champasak 1 2 3 4 5 Sub-Total Aluminium at Paksong District(SLACO)for the entire mine Aluminium at Paksong District(SINOMA) for the entire mine Aluminium at Paksong District(SINOMA) for Alumina refinery Economic Spacial Zone (Bolaven plateau) Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - 35.5 175.7 7.5 8.0 30.7 20.0 145.0 - - 47.7 312.4 15.0 111.7 8.0 30.7 20.0 145.0 4.7 25.0 63.5 428.0 30.0 223.4 8.0 30.7 20.0 145.0 5.5 28.9 142 991 100.0 744.6 8.0 30.7 20.0 145.0 5.0 21.9 9.5 49.7 Saravan 1 2 Sub-Total Cement Factory at Ta Leo Village, Saravane District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 12.6 71.7 12.6 71.7 - - 12.6 71.7 12 6 71.7 - - 12.6 71.7 1 6 71.7 - - 13.4 75.6 12 6 71.7 0.8 3.9 28. 154 12.6 71.7 15.8 82.8 Sekong 1 2 Sub-Total Aluminium at Daklan Village, Dakjung District Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - - - - - - - - - 9.6 50.5 9.6 50.5 22.8 119.8 22.8 119.8 58. 305 58.2 305.9 130 Attapeu 1 2 3 Sub-Total Gold/Copper Mining at Vangtun Village, Xanxai District Aluminium at Paksong District(SLACO) for Alumina refinery Total Load during Construction of Hydro Power Plants (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) (MW) (GWh) - - 3.8 19.7 3.8 19.7 3.8 19.7 3.8 19.7 - - - - - - - - - - Total (Southern) (MW) (GWh) 60.0 369.6 77.3 467.2 122.8 699.8 160.4 978.6 230.1 1,356.4 392 2,362 Whole Country (MW) (GWh) 92.0 579.8 264.6 1,511.2 464.2 2,618.2 572.5 3,194.7 788.5 4,353.8 1,280.5 7,083.2 131 LIST OF AUTHOR’S PUBLICATIONS 1. Khammany INTHIRATH, Power sector status of Lao PDR and Lao–Vietnam cooperation on power project development, Lao-Vietnam international Economic Seminar In Vietiane Capital 26/10/2012, Book III, Pages 104. 2. Khammany INTHIRATH, Promotion of Foreign Direct Investments for the development of Energy sector in Lao PDR, Lao Magazine ALOUNMAI, Date October 2011, Page 53. 3. Khammany Inthirath, Investments in Hydropower Development in Lao PDR, Scientific Seminar Lao PDR – SR of Vietnam, Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR, 2011, Book II, Pages 53

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